House District 13

Archive for April, 2011|Monthly archive page

House Concurrent Resolution 224 Requests that the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to partner with the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and other entities to provide support services to encourage successful farming on agricultural and pastoral lands

In News Release on April 14, 2011 at 6:26 pm

HONOLULU—On Wednesday, April 13, 2011, the members of the House Committee on Finance voted to pass unamended, House Concurrent Resolution 224. Introduced by Representative Mele Carroll, House Concurrent Resolution 224 calls for the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL) to partner with the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and other entities to provide support services to encourage successful farming on DHHL agricultural and pastoral lands.

A 2010 study by the Center for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA) revealed that although there are nearly twenty thousand applicants for agricultural and pastoral leases on homestead land, fewer than sixteen hundred have actually been awarded leases. The Department of Hawaiian Home Lands has proven that partnerships with other entities, such as the University of Hawaii College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, can be beneficial in expanding its educational and technical assistance programs.

With the augmentation of support services by partnering with other entities, such as the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, the increase in the number of successful homesteaders in agricultural enterprises can be accelerated. With the gainful knowledge and training in commercial and subsistence agricultural production, best management practices, marketing, financial, and business skills, more homesteaders can put be in the best possible position to succeed.

Rep. Mele Carroll said, “This legislation will not only fortify efforts that will nobly benefit current lessees of Hawaiian Home Lands, but also those who are humbly waiting the awarding of future leases. The passing of House Concurrent Resolution 224 helps bring to the forefront the importance and need for the establishment of partnerships that will promote the success of our Hawaiian homesteaders. These partnerships will provide a solid foundation for that success to continue and build on.”

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House Committee on Finance passes House Concurrent Resolution 225. Requests Office of Hawaiian Affairs to study feasibility of establishing Kanaka villages for homeless native Hawaiians

In News Release on April 14, 2011 at 6:24 pm

HONOLULU—On Wednesday, April 13, 2011, the members of the House Committee on Finance passed House Concurrent Resolution 225 as is. Introduced by Representative Mele Carroll, House Concurrent Resolution 225 requests that the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) study the feasibility of establishing Kanaka villages for the homeless population whom are, or could possibly be, beneficiaries of Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL).

The purpose of this resolution is to address the disproportionate representation of native Hawaiians among the State’s homeless (nearly 40%) by requesting that the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to conduct a feasibility study of establishing a kanaka village for those native Hawaiians that are homeless in Hawai’i. For the purposes of this Resolution, “kanaka village” means a community where native Hawaiians who are homeless, may live in tents or other approved types of shelter and subsist off the land utilizing traditional Hawaiian methods of sustainability as they progress towards home ownership.

Rep. Mele Carroll stated, “The passing of House Concurrent Resolution 225 by the Committee on Finance is a significant sign that the legislature is taking measures into hand by improving the plight of Hawaii’i’s homeless population. This critical issue requires our utmost attention as a community, to not only protect and insure the safety of our people, but to lead by example in creating safe havens for those not supported by Hawaii’i’s social safety net. House Concurrent Resolution 225 calls for the feasibility study of a program to provide for a native Hawaiian village area on Hawaiian Homelands where our native Hawaiians whom are homeless can reside without fear of harassment and eviction that is so prevalent in dealing with the homeless in Hawai’i. This is also an attempt to fulfill the Hawaiian Home Lands Act where the rehabilitation of our people can take place.”

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House Finance Committee passes House Concurrent Resolution 315 requesting the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to study the feasibility of jointly establishing a native Hawaiian technology park

In News Release on April 14, 2011 at 6:21 pm

HONOLULU—On Wednesday, April 13, 2011, the members of the House Committee on Finance voted to pass House Concurrent Resolution 315 as is. Introduced by Representative Mele Carroll, House Concurrent Resolution 315 calls for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to convene a task force to study the feasibility of establishing a native Hawaiian research, science, and technology park.

The development of a research, science, and technology park is an important step in creating and sustaining a vibrant high technology industry in the State. There are a number of native Hawaiian entrepreneurs who have the desire, but lack the necessary resources and technical support to develop projects in the research, science, and technology fields.

A native Hawaiian research, science, and technology park would be a crucial foundational component for the development of native Hawaiian entrepreneurs. It would greatly assist in training for the inevitable business start-up challenges by providing invaluable resources and professional expertise and guidance.

In addition to the assistance of native Hawaiian business organizations with the potential or willingness to participate, House Concurrent Resolution 315 also provides for the identification of qualified personnel to administer and effectuate the objectives of the project.

Rep. Mele Carroll said, “I am very elated that my colleagues in the Finance Committee have passed House Concurrent Resolution 315. This resolution goes to the heart of implementing a much needed facility by studying the feasibility of establishing a technology park that will help train and guide our future generations of entrepreneurs by positioning them to be at the forefront of technological development on a worldwide scale.”

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Dept. of Health to hold Dengue Fever Community Meeting in Haiku 4/18/2011

In News Release on April 13, 2011 at 12:19 am

The Dept of Health will be holding a community meeting at the Haiku Community Center, Monday, April 18 to talk about dengue prevention and to ask the community for their support in cleaning up their areas.

World-renowned dengue fever expert Dr. Lorrin Pang, of the state Department of Health, will be presenting and will then give time for questions.

For more information contact the Maui District Health Office
54 S. High St. Rm. #301
Wailuku, HI 96793
Tel: (808) 984-8200

House Concurrent Resolution 224 passes out of Joint Committees on Hawaiian Affairs and Agriculture, requests that the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to partner with the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and other entities to provide support services to encourage successful farming on agricultural and pastoral lands

In News Release on April 4, 2011 at 8:46 pm

HONOLULU—On Friday, April 1, 2011, the members of the Joint House Committees on Hawaiian Affairs and Agriculture voted to pass House Concurrent Resolution 224. Introduced by Representative Mele Carroll, House Concurrent Resolution 224 calls for the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to partner with the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and other entities to provide support services to encourage successful farming on agricultural and pastoral lands.

A 2010 study by the Center for Native Hawaiian Advancement revealed that although there are nearly twenty thousand applicants for agricultural and pastoral leases on homestead land, fewer than sixteen hundred have actually been awarded leases. The Department of Hawaiian Home Lands has proven that partnerships with other entities, such as the University of Hawaii College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, can be beneficial in expanding its educational and technical assistance programs.
With the augmentation of support services by partnering with other entities, such as the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, the increase in the number of successful homesteaders in agricultural enterprises can be accelerated. With the gainful knowledge and training in commercial and subsistence agricultural production, best management practices, marketing, financial, and business skills, more homesteaders can put be in the best possible position to succeed.

Amendments made were to include the Department of Agriculture as one of the partnership entities.
Rep. Mele Carroll said, “The passing of House Concurrent Resolution 224 by the House committees on Hawaiian Affairs and Agriculture underlies the importance of, and need for, the establishment of partnerships for the escalation of successful homesteaders. These partnerships can provide a solid foundation and fortify efforts that will nobly benefit current lessees of Hawaiian Home Lands and those who are so humbly waiting for the awarding of future leases.”
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House Bill 1483 HD1 SD1, Reducing Department of Agriculture Water Rates for Moloka’i Irrigation Users and Providing Relief for Moloka’i Homestead Farmers Passes Senate Committee on Ways and Means

In News Release on April 4, 2011 at 8:45 pm

HONOLULU—On Wednesday, March 30, 2011, the members of the Senate Committee on Ways and Mean voted to pass House Bill 1483 HD1 SD1 with technical amendments. Introduced by Representative Mele Carroll, House Bill 1483 HD1 SD1 directs the Department of Agriculture to provide water to Moloka’i Irrigation System users who lease tracts of land under Section 207 of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act, 1920 as amended, at a reduced rate. It also allows that the Department of Agriculture may forgive past due bills for the provision of irrigation water for Moloka’i homestead farmers.

For the record, the intent of forgiving past due water bills one time was only going to be available to those DHHL homesteaders who are already delinquent and needed assistance with bringing their water bill current because they fell into default or was given notice by the Department of Agriculture that their water was going to be shut off.

Possible reasons for the lack of being able to pay their water bill and/or bring it current was due to the situation we are all experiencing with the hardships caused by the devastating economic downturn.

Amendments made were to change the words “…shall forgive…” to “…may forgive…”

Rep. Mele Carroll said, “With the passing of House Bill 1483 HD1 SD1 by the Senate Committee on Ways and Means, we are closer to bringing some much needed relief to Moloka’i’s homestead farmers, With the increasing severity of economic impacts facing Moloka’i and its residents on a daily basis, HB1483 HD1 SD1 will assist with the availability of affordable water. House Bill 1483 HD1 SD1 provides an additional instrument for the necessary financial relief that is imperative to sustain their livelihood.”

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House Concurrent Resolution 315 requesting the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to study the feasibility of jointly establishing a native Hawaiian technology park advances

In News Release on April 4, 2011 at 8:44 pm

HONOLULU—On Wednesday, March 30, 2011, the members of the House Joint Committees on Hawaiian Affairs and Economic Revitalization & Business voted to pass House Concurrent Resolution 315 with amendments. Introduced by Representative Mele Carroll, House Concurrent Resolution 315 calls for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to convene a task force to study the feasibility of establishing a native Hawaiian research, science, and technology park.

Amendments made were:
• to replace “…Office of Hawaiian Affairs…” with “…Department of Business and Economic
Development…”
• Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to go through inventory to find parcels
• seek additional sources of funding

The development of a research, science, and technology park would be an important step in creating and sustaining a vibrant high technology industry in the State. There are a number of native Hawaiian entrepreneurs who have the desire, but lack the necessary resources and technical support to develop projects in the research, science, and technology fields.

A native Hawaiian research, science, and technology park would be a crucial foundation for the development of native Hawaiian entrepreneurs. It would greatly assist in training for the inevitable business start-up challenges by providing invaluable resources and professional expertise and guidance.

In addition to the assistance of native Hawaiian business organizations with the potential or willingness to participate, House Concurrent Resolution 315 also provides for the identification of qualified personnel to administer and effectuate the objectives of the project.

Rep. Mele Carroll said, “I am very elated that the committees on Hawaiian Affairs and Economic Revitalization & Business have passed House Concurrent Resolution 315. This resolution goes to the study of implementing a much needed facility to help train and guide our future generations of entrepreneurs and position them to be at the forefront of technological development on a worldwide scale.”

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House Concurrent Resolution 318 passes out of Hawaiian Affairs Committee, requests the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to study the feasibility of developing arena and poultry testing & inspection facility

In News Release on April 4, 2011 at 8:42 pm

HONOLULU—On Wednesday, March 30, 2011, the members of the House Committee on Hawaiian Affairs voted to pass House Concurrent Resolution 318 with amendments. Introduced by Representative Mele Carroll, House Concurrent Resolution 318 calls for the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to convene a task force to study the feasibility of developing an arena and poultry testing and inspection facility on Hawaiian Home Lands on Moloka’i for the purpose of testing backyard poultry flocks for avian diseases.

Amendments made were:
• to change the language of the resolution to make the Chairperson voted upon by the members of the organizations involved and report back to the Chair of the Hawaiian Homes Commission.
• add two more members – one from Ho’olehua Livestock Association and one from Ho’olehua Homestead Association.

The seriousness with which avian flu and other maladies have stricken parts of the poultry industry worldwide are stark reminders of how fragile and sensitive or own poultry and other birds are. Given the remoteness of the Hawaiian islands, such an outbreak would have catastrophic consequences.

Rep. Mele Carroll said, “With the passing of the House Concurrent Resolution 318 by the committee on Hawaiian Affairs, the seriousness of avian health issues can be addressed. It is of the upmost importance that we do everything we can to implement the necessary inspection and treatment facilities to protect not only our poultry, but ourselves as well from dangerous and potentially deadly avian viruses.”

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