House District 13

Archive for March, 2009|Monthly archive page

Hawaiian Caucus Day at a glance

In Photos on March 28, 2009 at 3:43 am

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House Committee on Hawaiian Affairs passes resolutions, Senate bills

In News Release on March 26, 2009 at 10:55 am

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Honolulu. The House Hawaiian Affairs Committee passed bills that provide financial assistance for Bishop Museum and ‘Iolani Palace for the acquisition of art, establishes the Museum for Hawaiian Music and Dance, adds additional organizations for the State to consult with on burial sites, and permits the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to assign or transfer county affordable housing credits. The Committee, chaired by Rep. Mele Carroll, also passed two resolutions that request the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to convene a working group to review procedures pertaining to Native Hawaiian burial sites.

Senate Bill 602 HD2 authorizes the use of bond proceeds deposited into the State’s works of art special fund to support operations of culture and art organizations. The bill also provides financial assistance for Bishop Museum and ‘Iolani Palace for the acquisition and costs associated with works of art, which is defined to include, among other things, permanent displays of arts and live performances. Senate Bill 602 HD2 passed with technical amendments.

Senate Bill 1334 SD2 establishes the Museum for Hawaiian Music and Dance by creating an advisory committee to determine the type of institution the museum will be and its location as well as appropriates money for the design of and environmental assessment of the museum. Senate Bill 1334 SD2 passed unamended.

Senate Bill 1083 SD1 includes additional native Hawaiian organizations for the Department of Land and Natural Resources to consult with to determine whether a burial site should be preserved in place or relocated and to develop a list of candidates for the burial councils. Senate Bill 1083 SD1 passed with amendments, which adds to the list of organizations the Kamakuokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawai‘i, DLNR’s Historic Preservation Division, and Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai‘i Nei.

House Concurrent Resolution 226 and House Resolution 194 request the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to convene a working group to review the system and procedures for the review of Native Hawaiian burial sites. House Concurrent Resolution 226 passed with amendments. The recommendation was to add language to the resolutions to include that the working group would work with the State DLNR Historical Preservation Division in addressing and seeking solutions to the many serious concerns that the division is faced with, for example, the lack of qualified staffing, the overwhelming unresolved cases pertaining to our kupuna iwi, and other critical issues.

Senate Bill 1268 SD2 permits the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to assign or transfer county affordable housing credits and requires county approval within 60 days for DHHL to transfer the credits. Senate Bill 1268 SD2 passed with amendments. The recommendation was to add language clarifying that the tax credits and entitlements would only be allowed with the county’s approval. Furthermore, credits obtained in a county must be used in that same county. This measure was also amended to have a sunset of 2 years.

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Third Annual Legislative Hawaiian Caucus Day at the State Capitol showcases Hawaiian culture, practices, and values

In News Release on March 26, 2009 at 10:51 am

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Honolulu. The 2009 Legislative Hawaiian Caucus sponsored the third annual Hawaiian Caucus Day event at the State Capitol and worked in collaboration with the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, KAHEA and Na Kahu o Haloa in efforts of educating, demonstrating, and sharing the Hawaiian culture, practices, and values.

This year’s theme was maka o lili‘u: seeing through the eyes of Queen Lili‘uokalani.

Members of the Legislative Hawaiian Caucus wore traditional Hawaiian kihei, a rectangular garment worn over one shoulder and tied in a knot.

On the House Floor, Rep. Mele Carroll, Chairwoman of the House Hawaiian Affairs Committee and Chairwoman of the Legislative Hawaiian Caucus, introduced House Resolution 292, which honored the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu and the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, and presented Hawaiian Civic Club leaders a certificate of recognition for their services to Native Hawaiians and the people of Hawai‘i. The recognition coincides with the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu’s 90th anniversary and the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs’ 50th anniversary.

House Resolution 292 congratulates and commends the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu and the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs for their outstanding contributions and commitment to perpetuating the vision of Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalaniana‘ole Pi‘ikoi.

“Our appreciation for the longstanding service and leadership that the members of the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu provide to protect Hawai‘i’s future is commendable and deserves more than our applause,” Rep. Mele Carroll said.

The first Hawaiian Civic Club was created by Prince Kuhio in 1918 to ensure that Hawai‘i’s first people have an outspoken voice in their future. Prince Kuhio believed that the future of the Hawaiian community and its people could be protected and promoted only through an organized effort by Hawaiian leadership. He believed that Hawaiians should help their young people secure an education that would enable them to compete successfully in the new cultural environment introduced to Hawaii in the 19th century.

The Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu’s annual scholarship benefit fundraiser, Holoku Ball, has generated thousands of dollars for higher education opportunities for Hawaiians while perpetuating Hawaiian formal elegance.

In recognition of the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu’s 90th anniversary and the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs’ 50th anniversary, Rep. Mele Carroll and Rep. Roland Sagum III presented the certificate and leis to Leimomi Khan, president of the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs; Leatrice Kauahi, president of the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu; Anita Naone, immediate past president of the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu; Momi Clark, director of the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu; and Manu Boyd, past president of the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu.

Education and Demonstration

As part of the day’s celebration, a Taro Festival was hosted by the Legislative Hawaiian Caucus, KAHEA and Na Kahu o Haloa on the ground floor rotunda of the State Capitol. Hundreds arrived to watch taro farmers from throughout the state participate in the largest unified gathering of Ku‘i Kalo to celebrate Hawai‘i’s living taro traditions.

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs provided lunch on the third floor: kalua pig, lau lau, squid luau, poi, chicken long rice, haupia, sweet potato and pineapple.

The third and fourth floors of the State Capitol featured informational and educational exhibits and demonstrations by Native Hawaiian Practitioners, agencies, non-profits, and community groups.

Among the exhibitors were Bishop Museum, the National Conference of State Legislatures — State Tribal Institute, Ke Ola Mamo, Popoho Na Pe‘a, Kawakini NC Charter School, Ho‘okako‘o Corporation, Ko‘olaupoko Hawaiian Civic Club, Kalo‘oiwi, Creations of Hawai‘i, Alu Like, Inc., Tom “Pohaku” Stone, Ka Huli Ao: Native Hawaiian Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian law, Kamehameha Schools, Hawai‘i Tourism Authority, SMG Hawai‘i Convention Center, ‘Iolani Palace, Ko‘olauloa HCC, Kahana Valley Community Association, Hakipiu Learning Center, Kaho‘olawe Island Reserve, Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, DOCARE, Royal Order of Kamehameha I, Martha’s Lei Stand, Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, King Kamehameha Celebration, Kokua Ohana, Moloka‘i Community Health Center, Kanaka Council, Partnership Alliance, Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, and Pa‘u Drapings.

Legislative Hawaiian Caucus Day celebrated at State Capitol

In News Release on March 24, 2009 at 8:52 pm

Members of the Legislative Hawaiian Caucus pose for a group picture after a Kukakuka meeting in January. The Legislative Hawaiian Caucus is composed of 28 members for the 2009 session, the largest membership it has ever had.

Members of the Legislative Hawaiian Caucus pose for a group picture after a Kukakuka meeting in January. The Legislative Hawaiian Caucus is composed of 28 members for the 2009 session, the largest membership it has ever had.


Honolulu. The 2009 Legislative Hawaiian Caucus celebrates its annual festivities today at the State Capitol on Tuesday, March 24 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The purpose of this event is to honor, preserve, and perpetuate Native Hawaiian culture through education and demonstration.

As part of the celebration, the O‘ahu Taro Festival will take place on the State Capitol’s ground level Rotunda with a special presentation at 11 a.m. Taro lovers from throughout Hawai‘i will unite to ku‘i kalo – traditional taro pounding and poi making. The festival will also feature education booths, music, art, games, food and cultural demonstrations.

The third and fourth floors of the State Capitol will also feature informational and educational exhibits and demonstrations by Native Hawaiian Practitioners, agencies, non-profits, and community groups.

LEGISLATIVE HAWAIIAN CAUCUS DAY

When: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Where: Hawaii State Capitol

 

 

The Legislative Hawaiian Caucus is composed of 28 members for the 2009 session, the largest membership it has ever had: Rep. Mele Carroll (Chair), Sen. J. Kalani English (Vice-Chair), Sen. Clayton Hee, Sen. Brickwood Galuteria, Sen. Michelle Kidani, Sen. Norman Sakamoto, Sen. Suzanne Chun-Oakland, Rep. Karen Awana, Rep. Pono Chong, Rep. Faye Hanohano, Rep. Hermina Morita, Rep. Roland Sagum III, Rep. James Kunane Tokioka, Rep. Chris Lee, Rep. Maile Shimabukuro, Rep. Sharon E. Har, Rep. Lyla B. Berg, Rep. Angus McKelvey, Rep. Joe Bertram, Rep. Joey Manahan, Rep. Cindy Evans, Rep. Cindy Evans, Rep. Tom Brower, Rep. Jessica Wooley, Rep. Lynn Finnegan, Rep. Scott Saiki, Rep. Sylvia Luke, Rep. Della Au Bellatti, and Rep. Gene Ward.

Pulling taro back home on Maui

In Photos on March 21, 2009 at 2:03 am

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Rep. Mele Carroll’s Legislative Resolutions

In News Release on March 21, 2009 at 1:09 am

Honolulu. Rep. Mele Carroll introduced the following resolutions for the 2009 Legislative Session:

HCR74
Requesting the Legislative Reference Bureau in consultation with the State Board of Massage Therapy to study massage therapy licensure standards and procedures of other states and whether Hawai‘i’s laws prevent qualified massage therapists educated and trained in another state from practicing in Hawai‘i.

HCR75
Requesting the United States Postal Service to issue a stamp honoring Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalani‘anaole.

HCR80
Requesting that the Governor withdraw the State’s petition for writ of certiorari in Hawaii v. Office of Hawaiian affairs, no. 07-1372 in the Supreme Court of the United States.

HCR81
Requesting withdrawal of the State’s appeal pending before the United States Supreme Court in Hawaii v. Office of Hawaiian Affairs, no. 07-1372.

HCR125
Requesting the University of Hawai‘i’s public policy center to meet with, and adopt the recommendations of the Kanaka Maoli Committee with respect to the center’s review of the 2050 Sustainability Plan.

HCR126
Requesting the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to work with the Hawai‘i Nuiakea School of Hawaiian knowledge of the University of Hawai‘i to develop a kupuna honorary degree program.

HCR127
Requesting the Chief Election Officer to carry out various tasks to ensure that voting ballots are secured and counted accurately.

HCR128
Requesting review of existing reports and studies related to aspartame and rescission of approval of aspartame for United States markets.

HCR177
Requesting the Department of Agriculture to explore and develop incentives and preferences for small farmers to allow them to expand and continue to contribute to the food self-sufficiency of the state.

HCR178
Requesting the Department of Education to transfer the Old Keanae School to the Department of Land and Natural Resources.

HCR179
Expressing support for the United States geological survey report, “the coral reef of south Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i: portrait of a sediment threatened fringing reef”, and encouraging federal, state, and community cooperation to steward the South Moloka‘i Reef Fishery.

HCR180
Urging the Office of Elections to not transmit vote information over telephone lines and the internet.

HCR181
Requesting the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to determine the feasibility of establishing early childhood education centers in each of its homestead communities.

HCR182
Requesting the Department of Land and Natural Resources to determine whether Makapipi Stream is being sufficiently protected in the public interest.

HCR183
Requesting the Board of Land and Natural Resources to refrain from selling, exchanging, or otherwise alienating lands in the public land trust.

HCR184
Requesting the state building code council to adopt standards and criteria to allow the use of bamboo as an accepted construction material under the state building code.

HCR226
Requesting the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to convene a working group to review the system and procedures for the review of Native Hawaiian Burial Sites.

HCR227
Urging the Department of Transportation to reconsider its lease prices with rental car agencies at Moloka‘i Airport.

HCR228
Urging the public utilities commission to not allow Young Brothers, Ltd., to discontinue less-than-container-load shipping to and from Maui, Moloka‘i, and Lana‘i.

HCR229
Urging the counties to adopt measures that provide real property tax relief for owners of kuleana lands.

HCR232
Requesting the Department of Land and Natural Resources and the Department of accounting and general services to conduct an independent appraisal of Moloka‘i properties limited’s landholdings on the island of Moloka‘i.

HCR233
Requesting the governor, the Office of Hawaiian affairs, and the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to organize and convene a conference to begin discussions for a Hawaiian Constitutional Convention.

HCR234
Requesting the Department of Land and Natural Resources to designate all state waters and submerged lands within an irregular line of five miles offshore that is parallel to the contours of Moloka‘i’s shoreline as the Moloka‘i community-based subsistence fishing area.

HCR235
Requesting the Department of Land and Natural Resources to give priority to state leases for agricultural and ranching operations over state leases for energy facility operation projects with respect to lease extensions and renewals.

HCR236
Requesting the Board of Education to exempt public schools on Moloka‘i from the single school calendar.

HCR237
Requesting the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to conduct a study on the feasibility of establishing early childhood education centers in Hawaiian homestead communities.

HCR238
Requesting the Department of the Attorney General to investigate and assist in the resolution of the issue of ownership of Ulalena Loop Road.

HCR239
Urging the Department of Land and Natural Resources to allocate funds for beautification and restoration projects on East Maui to eliminate invasive species, restore instream flows, and provide for additional conservation and resources enforcement personnel.

HCR240
Requesting the Department of Human Services to determine the feasibility of increasing the board payment rate for foster boarding home parents, group homes, and child caring institutions.

HCR241
Declaring October 11th a State Holiday in honor of blessed Damien.

HCR270
Requesting that the Department of Taxation undertake a study to determine the feasibility of exempting from the general excise tax imposed under chapter 237, Hawai‘i Revised Statutes, less than container load shipping to the islands of the County of Maui.

HCR271
Urging the governor and the Legislature to request and provide for sufficient funding for the Department of Hawaiian homesteads.

HR60
Requesting the Legislative Reference Bureau in consultation with the State Board of Massage Therapy to study massage therapy licensure standards and procedures of other states and whether Hawai‘i’s laws prevent qualified massage therapists educated and trained in another state from practicing in Hawai‘i.

HR61
Requesting the United States Postal Service to issue a stamp honoring Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalani‘anaole.

HR62
Requesting that the governor withdraw the state’s petition for writ of certiorari in Hawai‘i v. Office of Hawaiian Affairs, no. 07-1372 in the Supreme Court of the United States.

HR63
Requesting withdrawal of the State’s appeal pending before the United States Supreme Court in Hawai‘i v. Office of Hawaiian affairs, no. 07-1372.

HR103
Requesting the University of Hawai‘i’s Public Policy Center to meet with, and adopt the recommendations of the Kanaka Maoli Committee with respect to the center’s review of the 2050 Sustainability Plan.

HR104
Requesting the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to work with the Hawaii‘nuiakea School of Hawaiian Knowledge of the University of Hawai‘i to develop a kupuna honorary degree program.

HR105
Requesting the Chief Election Officer to carry out various tasks to ensure that voting ballots are secured and counted accurately.

HR141
Requesting the Department of Agriculture to explore and develop incentives and preferences for small farmers to allow them to expand and continue to contribute to the food self-sufficiency of the State.

HR142
Requesting the Department of Education to transfer the Old Keanae School to the Department of Land and Natural Resources.

HR143
Expressing support for the United States geological survey report, “the coral reef of South Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i: portrait of a sediment threatened fringing reef”, and encouraging federal, state, and community cooperation to steward the South Moloka‘i Reef Fishery.

HR144
Urging the Office of Elections to not transmit vote information over telephone lines and the Internet.

HR145
Requesting the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to determine the feasibility of establishing early childhood education centers in each of its homestead communities.

HR146
Requesting the Department of Land and Natural Resources to determine whether Makapipi Stream is being sufficiently protected in the public interest.

HR147
Requesting the Board of Land and Natural Resources to refrain from selling, exchanging, or otherwise alienating lands in the public land trust.

HR148
Requesting the State Building Code Council to adopt standards and criteria to allow the use of bamboo as an accepted construction material under the state building code.

HR194
Requesting the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to convene a working group to review the system and procedures for the review of native Hawaiian burial sites.

HR195
Requesting review of existing reports and studies related to aspartame and recission of approval of aspartame for United States markets.

HR196
Urging the Department of Transportation to reconsider its lease prices with rental car agencies at Moloka‘i Airport.

HR197
Urging the Public Utilities Commission to not allow Young Brothers, Ltd., to discontinue less-than-container-load shipping to and from Maui, Moloka‘i, and Lana‘i.

HR198
Urging the counties to adopt measures that provide real property tax relief for owners of kuleana lands.

HR201
Requesting the Department of Land and Natural Resources and the Department of Accounting and General Services to conduct an Independent Appraisal of Moloka‘i Properties Limited’s landholdings on the island of Moloka‘i.

HR202
Requesting the governor, the Office of Hawaiian affairs, and the Department of Hawaiian home lands to organize and convene a conference to begin discussions for a Hawaiian Constitutional Convention.

HR203
Requesting the Department of Land and Natural Resources to designate all state waters and submerged lands within an irregular line of five miles offshore that is parallel to the contours of Molokai’s shoreline as the Moloka‘i community-based subsistence fishing area.

HR204
Requesting the Department of Land and Natural Resources to give priority to state leases for agricultural and ranching operations over state leases for energy facility operation projects with respect to lease extensions and renewals.

HR205
Requesting the Board of Education to exempt public schools on Moloka‘i from the single school calendar.

HR206
Requesting the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to conduct a study on the feasibility of establishing early childhood education centers in Hawaiian homestead communities.

HR207
Requesting the Department of the Attorney General to investigate and assist in the resolution of the issue of ownership of Ulalena Loop Road.

HR208
Urging the Department of Land and Natural Resources to allocate funds for beautification and restoration projects on East Maui to eliminate invasive species, restore instream flows, and provide for additional conservation and resources enforcement personnel.

HR209
Requesting the Department of Human Services to determine the feasibility of increasing the board payment rate for foster boarding home parents, group homes, and child caring institutions.

HR210
Declaring October 11th a State holiday in honor of Blessed Damien.

HR240
Requesting that the Department of Taxation undertake a study to determine the feasibility of exempting from the general excise tax imposed under chapter 237, Hawai‘i Revised Statutes, less than container load shipping to the islands of the County of Maui.

HR241
Urging the governor and the Legislature to request and provide for sufficient funding for the Department of Hawaiian Homesteads.

“Ceded lands” discussions on the forefront

In Photos on March 19, 2009 at 11:04 pm
Rep. Mele Carroll met with U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka during her visit to Washington D.C. to reach out to the Obama Administration on the issue of "ceded lands."

Rep. Mele Carroll met with U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka during her visit to Washington D.C. to reach out to the Obama Administration on the issue of "ceded lands."


Members of the Royal Order of Kamehameha I accompanied Rep. Mele Carroll in the nation's Capital.

Members of the Royal Order of Kamehameha I accompanied Rep. Mele Carroll in the nation's Capital.

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Rep. Mele Carroll met with former Hawaii Governor John Waihee to talk about "ceded lands" on March 17, 2009.

Rep. Mele Carroll met with former Hawaii Governor John Waihee to talk about "ceded lands" on March 17, 2009.

We must keep Hawaiian issues in the forefront of discussion

In Mele's Words on March 19, 2009 at 10:43 pm
In February, Rep. Mele Carroll travelled to Washington D.C. to reach out to President Barrack Obama’s administration on the issue of “ceded lands.”

In February, Rep. Mele Carroll travelled to Washington D.C. to reach out to President Barrack Obama’s administration on the issue of “ceded lands.”

This Legislative Session has brought to the forefront many Hawaiian issues, including those of “ceded lands,” protecting taro, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.

As Chairwoman of the House Hawaiian Affairs Committee and Chairwoman of the Legislative Hawaiian Caucus, which consists of six State Senators and 22 State Representatives, I have kept an open and transparent discussion to educate lawmakers on the cultural, emotional, and inherent significance of these “ceded lands” to the Hawaiian people.

In late January 2009, the Caucus supported a full moratorium on the selling of “ceded lands” and introduced a bill that became the Caucus’ priority as part of a legislative package.

The legislative fight for a moratorium is one that has united kupuna, native Hawaiians, lawmakers, communities, and activists from across the state. The resounding support to bar the selling of “ceded lands” until the reconciliation process can take place is not simply there to institute a legal measure. The powerful emotions and voices that have emerged from our Kukakuka with Hawai‘i’s community reflect the willingness of Hawai‘i’s people to continue to move forward with this healing process and to protect the lands for future generations.

In February, I travelled to Washington D.C. to reach out to President Barrack Obama’s administration on the issue of “ceded lands.” While I was not able to speak with the President in person, I did establish a presence with his administration and open the line of communication for future discussions on this issue. It is essential that the “ceded lands” discussion continues at every level of government in order to educate the public in finding the most effective and just way to reach reconciliation with the Hawaiian people.

I also found it essential to bring the discussion of addressing income due to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, as constitutionally mandated for the 30-year period from November 7, 1978 to July 1, 2008, to the Hawaiian people from across the state. In February, I took the House Hawaiian Affairs Committee to Moloka‘i, Maui, Kona, Hilo, and Kaua‘i to hear testimony on House Bill 901, which explores finally meeting the State’s obligation to OHA for that 30-year period settlement through an exchange in land.

This legislative session also saw Hawai‘i’s commitment to ensuring taro security when the House Committee on Hawaiian Affairs received over 500 testimonies in support of a bill to prohibit the development, testing, propagation, release, importation, planting or growing of genetically modified taro in the State of Hawai‘i.

Through active participation and by keeping the lines of communication open between the Hawaiian community, general public, and lawmakers, all of Hawai‘i’s people will be able to ensure a future that is pono.

House Committee on Hawaiian Affairs passes five Senate bills

In News Release on March 19, 2009 at 7:25 am

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Honolulu. Today, the House Hawaiian Affairs Committee passed five Senate bills pertaining to the State’s proper use of the Hawaiian language, a prohibition on genetically engineered taro, resolving claims due to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, prohibiting the sale of “ceded lands,” and extending the sunset date for the ‘Aha Kiole Advisory Committee.

Senate Bill 1108 allows the ‘Aha Kiole Advisory Committee to continue its mission beyond 2009 for two more years. ‘Aha Kiole was established in 2007 with the purpose of fostering understanding and practical use of knowledge, including native Hawaiian methodology and expertise, to assure responsible stewardship and awareness of the interconnectedness of the clouds, forests, valleys, land, streams, fishponds, and sea.

“I think it’s a good thing that in the mokus we are taking a grassroots approach and gathering data from the community on what is the best way to structure the ‘Aha Moku Councils,” said Rep. Mele Carroll, Chairwoman of the House Hawaiian Affairs Committee. “The extension of the sunset date will allow time for the ‘Aha Kiole Advisory Committee to bring forth the information to the Legislature and implement the process.”

Senate Bill 1108 passed unamended today. Rep. Mele Carroll encouraged the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to participate and assist the ‘Aha Kiole Advisory Committee to help bridge and bring the people together in efforts of accomplishing the mission of creating the ‘Aha Moku Councils.

Senate Bill 579 SD2 aims to ensure the constitutionally and ethically-mandated preservation of the Hawaiian language and culture by requiring newly created State and County letterheads, symbols, and emblems to contain the accurate, appropriate, and authentic Hawaiian names and language. Senate Bill 579 SD2 passed with amendments, which removes documents from the provision to reflect the intent of the bill, which mirrors the House Bill 1666 HD1 version.

Senate Bill 709 SD2 states that no genetically engineered taro shall be developed, tested, propagated, released, imported, planted, or grown in Hawai‘i. Senate Bill 709 SD2 passed with amendments to Section 1, pg. 5, lines 3-6, to include: “This Act does not prevent the University of Hawai‘i from conducting field testing and commercial propagation of successful new varieties of taro outside the State, [amended language in italics] excluding any named or unnamed taro whose lineage has been determined to be Hawaiian.”

Furthermore, the House Committee on Hawaiian Affairs amended Section 2, §-1, to include: “’Hawaiian taro’ means the following varieties of taro: aweu, man aula, mana opelu, mana weo, mana ulaula, mana lauloa, mana keokeo, mana kukuluhema, piko lehua-apei, piko ulaula, piko kea, piko keokeo, piko uaua, piko uliuli, piko eleele, elepaio, uahiapele, manapiko, kai uliuli, kai ala, kai kea, apuwai, apu, piialii, paakai, moana, lauloa eleele-omao, lauloa eleele-ula, lauloa palakea-eleele, lauloa palakea-ula, lauloa palakea-papamu, lauloa palakea-keokeo, lauloa keokeo, eleele makoko, eleele naioea, manini-owali, kumu-eleele, nawao, ulaula kumu, ulaula poni, ulaula moano, oopukai, manini uliuli, manini kea, papakolea-koae, ula, nihopuu, manini-opelu, hinupuaa, ohe, lehua maoli, lehua keokeo, lehua eleele, lehua palaii, apowale, wehiwa, papapueo, kuoho, leo, maea, haokea, kalalau, hapuu, laaloa, lauloa, uliuli, lihilihimolina, mana eleele, mana okoa, moi, oene, pikoele, pololu, Maui lehua, red moi, and any named or unnamed taro whose lineage has been determined to be Hawaiian.”

Senate Bill 995 SD2 resolves claims and disputes relating to the portion of income and proceeds from the lands of the public land trust for use by OHA between November 7, 1978 and July 1, 2009. Senate Bill 995 SD2 passed with amendments, which removes all the properties except Kaka‘ako Makai property. The bill was also changed to look like House Bill 901 HD2 with the exceptions of adding $200 million in value of the settlement.

Senate Bill 1085 SD2 prohibits the sale or transfer of “ceded lands.” Senate Bill 1085 SD2 was passed with amendments where the effective date of July 1, 2050 was changed to “upon its approval this bill will take effect.”

Legislative Hawaiian Caucus holds meeting on DHHL funding

In News Release on March 18, 2009 at 6:52 am

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Honolulu. Today, Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation attorney Alan Murakami presented information to members of the Legislative Hawaiian Caucus, chaired by Rep. Mele Carroll, on the State’s obligation in funding the Department of Hawaiian Homelands.

“If you look at DHHL funding, both in the CIP and in the general budget, I think you’ll see that the funding has not been adequate in either area,” Murakami said. “If you look at the DHHL operating budget, we’re saying that is not adequate. Zero dollars is insufficient.”

Defunding of the general fund budget of DHHL, as proposed by the Lingle Administration is a violation of Article XII, Section 1 of the Hawai‘i Constitution, Murakami told Caucus members.

The provision in the Constitution says that the Legislature shall make sufficient sums available for the administration and operating budget of the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands.

Murakami said that DHHL has received less than 1.6 percent of the State’s general budget since the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act was established.

The DHHL waiting list today is up to 23,500 applicants, up 200 percent since 1978, with 1,700 who have been waiting for over 30 years.

“How can we say the spirit of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act was being faithfully administered when we have forgotten as a State that we are supposed to fund this department,” Murakami said.

DHHL Director Micah Kane, who attended today’s Caucus meeting, did not comment on the presentation.

Rep. Mele Carroll said that the Legislative Hawaiian Caucus will facilitate a continued discussion in writing between Caucus members, DHHL, and Murakami.

The Legislative Hawaiian Caucus is composed of 28 members for the 2009 session, the largest membership it has ever had: Rep. Mele Carroll (Chair), Sen. J. Kalani English (Vice-Chair), Sen. Clayton Hee, Sen. Brickwood Galuteria, Sen. Michelle Kidani, Sen. Norman Sakamoto, Sen. Suzanne Chun-Oakland, Rep. Karen Awana, Rep. Pono Chong, Rep. Faye Hanohano, Rep. Hermina Morita, Rep. Roland Sagum III, Rep. James Kunane Tokioka, Rep. Chris Lee, Rep. Maile Shimabukuro, Rep. Sharon E. Har, Rep. Lyla B. Berg, Rep. Angus McKelvey, Rep. Joe Bertram, Rep. Joey Manahan, Rep. Cindy Evans, Rep. Cindy Evans, Rep. Tom Brower, Rep. Jessica Wooley, Rep. Lynn Finnegan, Rep. Scott Saiki, Rep. Sylvia Luke, Rep. Della Au Bellatti, and Rep. Gene Ward.